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Interview

Interview with Riley Roth

Riley RothThanks to GSC Reporter, Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: What first got you into music?

Riley Roth: My parents tell me that I have been singing since before I could talk, but it really became a bigger interest when I started musical theater at eight years old. I fell in love with singing, picked up the guitar, and started writing songs at 10 years old. By the age of 12, I was playing local shows, then doing shows out of state. My love for performing just kept growing.

DR: How did you meet Sheree and get involved with GSC?

RR: I made trips to Nashville every month for two years, before I moved here last March. During that time, I had the opportunity to meet a lot of great writers and connections. Someone whom I met, here in Nashville, reached out and suggested that I join Global Songwriters Connection. I met Sheree after I joined. I absolutely love her! She is a blessing and inspires and encourages me to grow as both a writer and an artist.

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Interview with Anne-Louise Sterry

Anne Louise SterryThanks to GSC Reporter, Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: How did you meet Sheree and get involved in GSC?

Anne-Louise Sterry: My friend Amy Russ, was at the Live on Stage conference. She shared a CD one of my songs with Sheree and we got connected. Now I am working with her on getting my song ‘”If I Had Loved You More” out into the world, as well as helping me share Audacious Joy around the world!

DR: Audacious joy! I love that term. So you’re a speaker, author and storyteller…tell me more about that.

AS: Long story! I started singer and storytelling with with toddlers. I was asked to speak at an early childhood event, sharing how to use music and storytelling with children. From that small beginning came performing at grade schools all over the country, then Europe, writing a book, speaking at many different kinds of events, creating a CD course, an online course, writing songs and so it goes! I can honestly say I never planned this – I just wanted to sing and tell stories!! I realized that through all of this, joy was my focus. Now my speaking work always has the theme of ‘Sharing the Power of Audacious Joy.’ I also have an alter ego ‘Aunt Lena who also speaks and performs!!’

You can go to my web site http://www.anne-louise.com to see her! Oh gosh, you see why I said long story!

DR: Who are some of your musical influences?

AS: Broadway Musicals! The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Peter Paul and Mary, Kingston Trio…

DR: What are some songs you wish you’d written?

AS: Oh, so many cause the world is filled with beautiful music! Right now it is “Imagine” by John Lennon.

DR: Do you have any projects in the works?

AS: Yes, right now I am recording a CD of stories for children. I am also preparing for a tour of schools in California and a keynote for an early childhood conference.

DR: Wonderful! Well, the world could certainly use more audacious joy! Thank you for spreading it and spending some time answering questions!

 

Interview with Jessica Mack

Jessica MackThanks to GSC reporter, Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder:  So what brought you to Nashville?

Jessica Mack:  I guess ultimately the Lord – I was just praying like “Lord, where do You want me to go?” and He made it pretty clear that it was Nashville. He even kinda redirected me to music after I gave up on that dream.

DR: You gave up?

JM: Yeah, I kinda did. In college, I started out as a music major and you know you have to take classical theory and stuff. It just wasn’t my jam. I was falling asleep in class and worried it would destroy my love for music. So I switched majors and got a job in the corporate world – I got a job as a receptionist. What was cool about this job was that they had a company band! They had auditions for a lead singer because the old one got a deal or something, and I got the gig! It reintroduced me to my love of music! Then I felt like the Lord was calling me to pursue music on a full time basis.  So I returned to Arkansas for a year before moving to Nashville.

DR: So you’ve also been to Honduras and Haiti?

JM: Yes! And that was another cool thing. I remember hearing from the Lord in Haiti about what genre of music to do. This guy we were on the trip with – a pastor – was always singing. And someone on the trip was like “You’re always singing songs to the Lord!” and he said “If you’re going to sing about something, sing about the truth!” And that reinforced that I should do Christian music.

DR: So who are your musical influences?

JM: I’m very much a Pop girl. I love the Top 40. I love me some 90’s Pop…Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey. “Always Be My Baby” was my jam. And riding with my mom we’d always listen to Country or Christian – Reba, Jo Dee Messina, Shania Twain. I’ve always leaned more towards the females. For Christian music Natalie Grant, Nichole Nordeman, Stacie Orrico, Jaci Velasquez…a new influence I’ve discovered recently is Hollyn. She’s brought something different to the genre.

DR: What are some songs you wish you’d written?

JM: There’s so many good songs…I’m a sucker for worship songs like “Good, Good Father”. It’s simple and true. Songs that are glorifying to God and speaks to people and are transformative, you know? Pop songs, like just fun songs, this is totally opposite but like “…Baby, One More Time”. It’s a fun song that everybody knows. Or even like “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” – songs that bring joy, you know?

DR: How did you get hooked up with GSC?

JM: I think it was through Tanya Sue!

DR: She’s great, I love her!

JM: Me too! We had met on the street actually. So random. We were walking out of a concert or a hockey game and her and I just started talking and she’s just a little ball of joy. We wrote together and she told me about Sheree. I talked to my manager Paul, and he said “I know Sheree! She goes to my church!”  So I introduced myself and showed her my music and the rest is history. I know God orchestrated it. She’s been a huge blessing.

DR: I mentioned this recently, but she is the most supportive person I know for songwriters – she is 100% in their corner.

JM: It’s such an amazing thing. I relate it back to the Gospel  because it almost doesn’t make sense how supportive and sacrificial she can be of herself. She’s the embodiment of Christ.

DR: Do you have a project coming up that you want to talk about?

JM: Sure! I released my first EP in December, that was my Country EP. But I felt led to change tracks and do Christian. So I’ve been writing a lot and trying to build a catalog. I’m excited! I’ve written some songs with some really great writers. I’m hoping it’ll be out by the end of the year, maybe October. I might have a single this summer too.

DR: So aside from releasing an EP, what are your goals for this year?

JM: Good question. Have you ever heard how we’ve got 7 or 8 different spokes in our lives? Like, family, spiritual, financial, etc. So I’ve set goals for each of them but I guess in the forefront is finishing that EP, and another is going deeper into relationships with teen moms that I’ve been working with. The Lord has also called me to start a non profit home for teen moms.

DR: Tell me about that!

JM: Sure! When I got involved in Young Life, I didn’t know what I was getting myself into. But the Lord just broke my heart wide open. I came to realize there are so many young mothers who are in abusive relationships, who are homeless. And there’s no place that will take teenage mothers and their children. A lot of places won’t take both of them, they will separate them. It’s definitely one of the biggest calls I’ve had on my life.

DR: Well, very cool. Thanks for talking today!

JM: You’re welcome!

Interview with David Borys

David BorysThanks to GSC reporter, Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: How did you get into songwriting?

David Borys: Well, I started in a band in Canada, a band called The Steel Toe Boots, and we had some moderate success as an independent act, yet I noticed that as the band grew in reputation and I started to develop a strong network of other musicians, songwriters and music professionals, songwriting became more and more of a required activity. Eventually I found that songwriting gave me far more artistic satisfaction then performing, so much so that I was enjoying writing for other artists, watching them perform those songs, more than I was enjoying performing my own songs. Thus through the band and my early years in the country industry I really became interested in songwriting.

DR: Who are some of your musical influences?

DB: There are many. Certainly in musically everything I do is on a Bruce Springsteen barometer, meaning, would Bruce approve of this. Most of the time he might not, but nonetheless to me Bruce is the greatest. I love the classics CCR, The Band, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, etc, they all inform me musically one way or another. In terms of current songwriters, I love the work that Hillary Lindsey, Chris Stapleton, and Shane McAnally, (just to name a few) are creating.

DR: How did you hear about GSC?

DB: Through Canadian representative Doug Folkins. One of many good pieces of advice he’s given me on my journey.

DR: What made you want to join?

DB: Doug mentioned that Sheree and the GSC provide a real forum of support, networking, connecting. It’s not just about taking your money and then letting you go on your merry way, it’s about giving you the tools and the knowledge to succeed.

DR: What do you feel is different about GSC?

DB: Simply that Sheree is so hands on with people. That if you want to be a part of the GSC community and grow as a songwriter/artist Sheree, and in turn GSC, is genuinely excited and motivated to help you succeed. so many other organizations will pay lip service to wanting to facilitate this type of growth but never really act on it.

DR: What are some songs you wish you’d written?

DB: Cop Car” written by Zach Crowell, Sam Hunt, and Matt Jenkins,  ・ Smoke” by A Thousand Horses, “A Case of You” by Joni Mitchell, “Thunder Road” by Bruce Springsteen, “What Are you Listening to” by Chris Stapleton.

DR: Not living in Nashville – much less the US – must present some interesting obstacles career wise. How do you work that out?

DB: It痴 not easy, especially with the dollar so low in Canada. I focus mostly on creating a strong writing group in Canada, there are some amazingly talented writers in Canada, many in Vancouver where I live, and I am trying to create a stable of writers that I feel I can create songs that are equal to those coming out of Nashville. While doing that I continue to build my relationships with writers in the US, yearly trips to Nashville, Skype writes and continued networking are all extremely important when you are not at the centre of an industry.

DR: What do you feel is the biggest difference between the Canadian music scene and Nashville?

DB: The Canadian music scene is so spread out, there is no one centre of creative output. Thus I write constantly with writers across the country via skype. But the Canadian music industry is strong, and because it is so much smaller than the US, one can network fairly effectively if at the write events. In general Skype has been an extremely useful tool in connecting me with so many other writers and industry professionals, as far south as Texas, and as far east as Nova Scotia.

DR: Thanks for your time today, David!

DB: You’re welcome!

Interview with Tanya Sue Pollard

Tanya Sue PollardThanks to GSC reporter, Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: I feel like everyone who has had contact with GSC knows who you are – you often reach out to members on Sheree’s behalf, you’re at mixers…but how did you get started with them?

Tanya Sue: Well, I knew Sheree from her days with NSAI – I had gone in to a mentoring session there, and I was in a low place. And she kind of stopped me, and said “I’ve gone through things as well, and we’re not going to count this as a session. You’re not alone.” She talked to me about what was going on in my life, and gave me a picture of a purple flower, which I still have to this day. So I started helping her with events she used to have, with events at the Orbison building. It was definitely a God thing.

DR: So you’ve been with GSC since day one, then. I don’t think I realized that!

TS: Yeah, she’s like my favorite person. I watched her build her company from the ground up.

DR: What do you think is different about GSC?

TS: GSC is fully based around heart – there’s so much heart and love, hard work and soul in that program that Sheree puts in. Her husband, and Jim, and everyone that’s a part of it. I’ve never known any organization that has that much love and care for members. She wants to encourage her members all the time, and she really loves and cares. No matter who the member is, she’ll always remember something about them – where they live, a lyric that they’ve written. No other place is like that.

DR: So what’s it been like working for Sheree?

TS: Honestly, it’s been amazing therapy for me. This sounds whatever, but she’s like an angel on this earth – I always call working with her therapy sessions. It helps me grow as a person – not just on the business side, but knowing who I am and believing in myself, and believing that I can do what I was meant to do in this world. So working with her is really a miracle, because I don’t know where I would have been if I hadn’t met her. Her positivity, her spirit, is just so contagious.

DR: It really is! So you have a mission, a purpose behind your music. Tell me about that.

TS: It was through Sheree, and she helped me realize this program. Dark City Light is bringing awareness to suicide and letting people know they’re not alone, and letting people know that you can get through it. And during that process when I was suffering, when you lose hope that’s like the danger zone. I was kind of in that phase when I started with Sheree, but as I went to therapy and started talking to Sheree more, she said “You know, you’ve lived through this….this is your calling.” She really helped encourage that inner spark in me that wanted to speak to men and women of all ages and all walks of life. Suicide is just a statistic, people are embarassed about it, it’s shunned. Peope don’t understand unless they’ve gone through it. So I’m out there to be a voice for those suffering with mental illness, depression, negative thoughts that have been programmed into their minds. To be a role model and spokesman, to let them know that they can get through this.

DR: So you actually are a public speaker as well?

TS: Yes, I worked with Glen Cliff school where we worked with the students for a few weeks and then put on a show in front of the high school body. My goal is to keep doing that, keep working with the high schools. And with the few high schools I’ve been talking to, the principals are pretty very responsive. They’ve had this stuff going on in their schools, and they feel it needs to be addressed. So that’s definitely a route I’ve been taking, and I’d love to start talking to different organizations as well.

DR: How did you get into songwriting, and being an artist?

TS: I have always loved music, from like 2 years of age. I probably shouldn’t have been watching Sister Act, but I loved it at 2 years old. The two movies I watched were Sister Act and Pocahontas. I wanted to be Whoopi Goldberg, because she was singing and on stage and I wanted to be Pocahontas because she was singing and dancing in the wind. My mom put me in dance lessons, and that was really the start – I was always known as the girl smiling on stage. I was singing from young on, I started in my church, in the youth group. I had a karaoke machine by the age of six. I didn’t think I was songwriting, I was just journaling a lot, like in my diaries. Who knew you could take stuff from that? I sang with my best friend for multiple years – duets at weddings, churches, funerals…fundraisers, a lot of that. Then him and I made it on that Can You Duet show. That was a great experience that awakened me to that whole Nashville scene, because I’m from a small town of less than 2,000. We never had any of that kind of thing by us.

DR: Who are you musical influences?

TS: I loved Karen Carpenter, Meat Loaf – the theatrical stuff – I loved Freddie Mercury. Nowadays I try to base my music off people like Avril Lavigne and Pink – strong voices saying something like “Wow, did she just say that?” You know, gutsy. And I love my girl Kelly Clarkson.

DR: How did you end up moving to Nashville?

TS: Well, after I did that Can You Duet show, I went back to college, worked with a producer, then I did a year abroad studying in Ireland. I still kept up with voice lessons and stuff at school, playing out with my band and stuff. Then senior year, I was like “Alright, I can either move to Chicago or move to Nashville.” The only person I knew was the producer/engineer I had worked with, but I picked up and moved. My housing fell through, so I ended up staying with him and his family for like, six months. In my heart I knew I had to go. It’s hard moving, but I had to do it. This is where I was being called to, and no it’s home.
Main stage.

GSC Interview with Bruce Miller

Bruce MillerGSC Interview with Bruce Miller

provided by reporter Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder:  Hey, Bruce! Thanks for talking today. So how long have you been evaluating songs?

Bruce Miller:  That’s a good question! I have to go back and look…I think It’s been about 7 or 8 years. I started at NSAI working with Sheree when she was there. I think they had like a 6 month backlog of songs to evaluate, and I got them caught up in like a month or something ridiculous like that. I had never done evaluations before, but I had taught songwriting and studied songwriting. And I had been writing for 25 or 30 years…more than that, really. I had studied songwriting a lot and I discovered that I was really good at song evaluations and I really liked doing it. I think I figured out that when I was at NSAI, I evaluated something like 14,000 songs – including contests – and I was their most requested evaluator. So I mentored writers on about 14,000 songs and I really enjoyed doing it. So that’s kind of the history of it.

DR: What would you say is the #1 thing that you constantly come across?

BM: Writers at different levels make different mistakes. I’d say the #1 thing that developing writers make is that they assume the listener knows what the story is about. They don’t give enough detail. They don’t give enough who, what, when, why, and where and the listener is lost. It’s a very common thing. Even professional writers I work with can sometimes forget that, and we have to go “Wait a minute…why does nobody understand this?” I think Jason Blume said something great one time. Someone asked him to explain the song to them, and he said “Unfortunately, songs just don’t come with instruction sheets.” So that’s probably one of the main things. And learning how to find a great hook is another thing, and making it pay off emotionally.

DR: Tell me a bit about your evaluation process.

BM:  I evaluate very organically. When I listen, it’s almost like I’m outside of myself, observing what I’m listening to. So if I’m not really engaged in the song, if I’m not feeling it, I need to find out why I’m not emotionally engaged by the song. And to me, that’s one of the most important things. Even if the song isn’t crafted well, if it doesn’t have the emotional content to it, it’s not doing its job. And each song has a job. I try to work with people to figure out what the job of each song is, and how to make sure that song is actually fulfilling what it’s supposed to do. As writers, we decide what that job is. There’s a few techniques I used to help people, like a checklist they can look at to see if the song is doing what they want it to do. In a vacuum it’s hard to know whether it’s doing its job, and if you know the right questions to ask, you can have a little more of a sense of what you’re writing. I tell people a song should move you in one of four ways: It should move your body, or your heart, or spiritually, or intellectually. If you get all four of those going at once, you’ve got a song that will live on forever.

DR:  Good answer.

BM: (laughs) Long answer. And you  know, people don’t realize how much of songwriting has to do with the human brain, and patterns. That’s how the brain really works, and how it’s really comfortable. When our brains can recognize a pattern quickly, it makes us feel good – the brain is really comfortable with that. That’s why we get anxious when things change. If you’ve ever moved, the first several months, you feel like you’re not in your body as much. You don’t know where the bathroom lightswitch is. And then finally you get acclimated to that and you become comfortable again. Part of being a commercial writer is about making people feel comfortable in a certain way. Like an old sweater. But we also crave variety, which is a paradox – we want variety in our patterns. We want the patterns, but we also want something new. I like to say we need something shiny. Songs that are memorable have something shiny in them that you haven’t seen before.

DR: Great thoughts. What are some songs you wish you’d written?

BM: I wish I had written “Ghost in this House”. I think it’s one of the most perfectly crafted songs that I’ve ever heard. I mean, I haven’t heard every song written, you know. But Alison Krauss does the best version of it – her voice captures so much of the emotion of that song. That’s one of my top ten. “The Song Remembers When” is another one. Both written by Hugh Prestwood.  I’m a huge fan of almost all the Beatles’ catalogue, melodically. I think their melodies are just unsurpassed in the 50 years since they’ve been around. It’s hard to find melodies that touch their stuff. I’m a big fan of the Eagles, and that whole cadre of songwriters from the 70’s – country rock writers. JD Souther, Glenn Frye, Don Henley, Don Felder. Linda Ronstadt wasn’t a writer, but she picked great material to record. Crosby, Stills, and Nash. And my all-time favorite writer/artist is Joni Mitchell. I’ve followed her music and her career pretty much since the beginning. I’ve just watched how she progressed and developed as a lyricist. It’s kind of like “learn everything you need to know about songwriting, and then throw it out the window”. She really knew the importance of a hook, and returning musical themes that are memorable.

DR: Let’s talk for a minute about your background. What got you into songwriting?

BM: Well, I’d been playing guitar since I was 13 and joined my first band when I was 14. I was always in bands, up until the time I was 40. When I went to college, I actually moved down to Los Angeles to be in an original project – we were being produced by Andy Johns who was Glyn John’s brother – he engineered Zeppelin and the Who. He was a big time British engineer. I moved to L.A. and I started doing club work as a professional guitarist and singer. I had written maybe 4 or 5 songs in high school. I later worked with Paul McCartney and Kenny Loggins. I was Laura Brannigan’s lead guitar player for several years – that was probably my longest gig. After being in several original bands, none of which I did the writing in,  I got tired of just being the guitar player. I felt like I had something to say, and I wanted to say it. I had a friend in Nashville who was a publisher, and he agreed to listen to my songs – I thought I knew how to write, and I thought I was writing country. You remember the sound tapes made when they were fast forwarded? (imitates the sound) That was the sound of my meeting. After that, I started taking songwriting lessons. I got involved with a songwriting organization out in L.A.  called NAS. I went to every meeting. I saw what the business was about, and just really got an education. I started writing and figuring it out – my songs were getting better. I started commuting to Nashville and went to Song Camp – that was a religious experience. Rick Beresford, Jon Ims, Don Henry, James Dean Hicks, Hugh Prestwood and Angela Kaset were teaching.

DR: They’re great.

BM: Yeah. I learned a lot. So that’s kind of my progression from wanting to do it, to learning how to do it, to doing it and eventually moving to Nashville. I love what I do. I love this part of it – being a teacher and mentoring people. Because I know how hard it is. I also love songs and songwriting, and being a songwriting mentor is really, really exciting for me. I get to witness this process with someone and get to help them find their legs as songwriters and get good at it.

DR:  Awesome. Well, do you have any parting thoughts?

BM: Yeah. I think what’s really important for people to understand is that they need to have an order of business they need to take care of in order to be successful. And the first thing they need to do is get their songwriting together. I don’t care how much networking you do, how much social media you do, I don’t care about any of that stuff. If your song is not competitive with what is happening within the market you’re in, there’s no way you’re gonna go anywhere. The most important thing you should be focusing on is getting your songs competitive. That is job one. Being able to have immediate feedback and have it from someone who isn’t going to make you feel bad, or make you feel like quitting is really, really important. That’s why the evaluation service with Global Songwriters is so crucial. It’s a great deal, and not to toot my own horn, but it’s with someone who can really help them. People complain all the time “Well, I can’t get anyone to help me.” You’ve got it right in front of you – this opportunity to increase your marketability by becoming a better songwriter. And you need good feedback so you can improve. It’s almost exponential how much better you get when you have someone who can nurture you along the way, and you’re working with them consistently. You’re gonna get a great feeling of progression that way.

DR: Thanks for the interview, man!

BM: You’re welcome! Have a good one!

 

 

Interview with Ree Boado

Ree BaodoGSC Interview with Ree Boado

provided by reporter Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: Great to meet you, Ree! Thanks for taking the time to talk to me. What got you into songwriting?

Ree Boado: Well, my journey into songwriting is a little different from most songwriters I’ve known. I was always passionate about lyrics and singing, though I didn’t grow up in a very musical family and wasn’t surrounded much by musical people. Music was always calling to me though. Some of my earliest and best memories involve music. I can remember being 8 years old and sitting behind the bushes in my front yard, reading and memorizing lyrics. I occasionally wrote bits of poetry and wrote some short stories that won some contests as a kid, but I never actually thought I could write a song since I didn’t play instruments at that time. And then one day in my early 20’s, I was in the shower and several lyrics and a melody line just came to me. That turned into my first song, which I later found piano chords for, thanks to a friend. After that small victory, then learning to play piano and guitar, songs have been flowing ever since. I guess the music was in there all along, just waiting for the right time to come out!

DR: Who are some of your musical influences?
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Interview with Joe Piasecki

Joe PiaseckiGSC Interview with Joe Piasecki

provided by reporter Dan Reifsnyder

Dan Reifsnyder: Tell me about how you got into songwriting.

Joe Piasecki: In 2001, I got a comedy song signed to Goodnight Kiss Music in L.A. In 2002 through GKM – I met #1 hit artist Alan O’ Day who sang “Undercover Angel”. We became friends through the years and in 2008, he cut my song “Hello Mom” in Nashville for his CD “I Hear Voices”. A wonderful man, may he rest in peace. I have co-written four songs with Alan’s good friend, and my mentor, Denny Martin, who is a fantastic Nashville producer and songwriter.

DR: Who are some of your musical influences?

JP: Tom Petty, Dwight Yoakam. Currently, I just found Beth Nielsen Chapman online and her thoughts about the initial creative process are incredible.

DR: I agree! She’s very sweet, too. What made you want to join GSC?

JP: I met Sheree briefly at NSAI in 2008 and her enthusiasm was inspiring.
When I saw she had her own business, I thought it was cool and inexpensive.

DR: What do you feel is different about GSC?

JP: Sheree! She should be a motivational speaker and travel the globe like Tony Robbins or something! I love the real world hook-ups she has provided me with. People I never would have met except through her. I currently have a very controversial song called “Think About It” that I’m going to pitch that was demoed as a result of Sheree finding me the perfect match for the song. She doesn’t really critique–she encourages. I hate when a song service will actually critique 1 or 2 syllables.

DR: Couldn’t agree more. I always walk away feeling inspired after a session with her – she’s a powerhouse of positive energy! What are some songs you wish you’d written?

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Interview: Trey Bruce

Interview with Emmy Award Winning Songwriter & Producer Trey Bruce

An Inside Look at Nashville’s Country Music Movers and Shakers

Trey Bruce

Featuring: Trey Bruce
Emmy Award Winning Songwriter & Producer


By Frances and Harry Date – Song Matchmakers Network


Emmy Award winning songwriter, Trey Bruce, moved to Nashville just in time for the 1990’s country music boom. Trey was a rock drummer from Memphis so…..what could go wrong? He credits a copy of Springsteen’s Tunnel Of Love as the bridge he had to cross to make the trip, lyrically & spiritually. Luckily, Trey’s first demo got cut immediately by Shelby Lynn and was a top 15 hit. As a result, he signed his first publishing deal with MCA Music.

After three years at MCA, in 1993, Trey co-founded a small indie publishing company, Big Tractor Music, with record producer Scott Hendricks. There he received 13 ASCAP Awards, an Emmy Award, five #1 singles, multiple top 5 & 10 hits and an Academy of Country Music Song of the Year nomination.

During the Big Tractor years, Trey developed a love for coffee and long nights in the studio, so he became a record producer. Trey’s first and still favorite record to make was Chris LeDoux’s critically acclaimed One Road Man followed by four Trace Adkins albums and Rebecca Lynn Howard’s Forgive. Over one-thousand songs later, Trey left Big Tractor in 2005 to partner with Kenny MacPherson and became VP of A&R and Creative for Chrysalis Music in the Nashville office.

At Chrysalis, Trey signed and developed new artists, such as GAC’s KingBilly, wrote a ton of new songs, and built a catalog of roughly 800 songs in five years, as well as cuts in the rock format and #1 singles in Australia and Canada. In 2010 Trey partnered with The Royalty Network in NY/LA and since that time has cuts in pop, rock and country formats as well as film and TV.

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Interview: Alicen Catron Schneider

Interview with Alicen Catron Schneider/NBCUniversal TV 

The Ins and Outs of Music Placement in Movies and TV Series

 Alicen Catron Schneider

Featuring: Alicen Catron Schneider
Vice President, Music Creative Services for NBCUniversal Television
By Frances and Harry Date – Song Matchmakers Network


Alicen is the head of the creative music division for NBC Universal Television, which she created and established seven years ago. She manages music strategies and personnel for all Studio productions. She contributes creative music for select NBC Agency promotional campaigns, most notably the Olympics, and assists with strategic music partnerships for the multiplatform marketing of shows.  Alicen operates as a music liaison between Network and Studio creative executives for stunt casting and on-camera opportunities as well as making composer recommendations for Universal Television produced programs.  In addition to this, she solicits the creation of original compositions and recordings for both promotional campaigns and series episodes.  Past projects include Heroes, The Event, Trauma, Lipstick Jungle, Crossing Jordan, and Monk, as well as The 60s and The 70s mini-series for NBC.  Most recently, Alicen has added a music business affairs component to her plate, taking on the negotiating of composer and music supervisor agreements, as well as assisting production executives with music budget estimates for new shows and lots and lots of troubleshooting. She is a frequent panelist at music festivals worldwide on the subject of music supervision for television.

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